The end of journalism as we know it?

A blog from informationweek.com described how the Air Force recently refuted reports that its GPS technology is failing. What was interesting is that it did so by going straight to the public… via Twitter.

The author, Mitch Wagner, concludes his blog by saying:

Social media allows government to take its message directly to the people, bypassing journalists. Much of journalism has always consisted of “he said she said” reporting. The journalist goes to a government official to get a statement, dutifully transcribes it, runs to an opponent to get an opposing statement, and then brings both those statements to the readers. Social media helps put he-said-she-said journalists out of a job, because the government official — and his opponent — can get their message directly to the people themselves. That means journalists need to concentrate on going beyond the public record and provide analysis and investigation.

Is he right? Do you see Twitter — or other social media tools — eventually changing the face of journalism (and, hence, media relations) as we now know it?

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3 Responses to “The end of journalism as we know it?”


  1. 1 Capt. David Faggard May 26, 2009 at 10:45 pm

    Thanks for the interesting note Chris. Take a look at our post at http://airforcelive.dodlive.mil.

  2. 2 chrishemrick May 26, 2009 at 10:48 pm

    Great article there, Dave. Thanks for sharing and keep up the good work!

  3. 3 Marta Vallejo Arenaz October 16, 2011 at 12:33 pm

    I totally agree. Public Institutions have now the way to connect directly with the general public. This means a further effort for them to communicate and share. It is not only the end of traditional journalism, but a new door to new communications.

    Marta Vallejo Arenaz


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